Seneca portfolio company Vizibl launches supplier sustainability platform

Seneca portfolio company Vizibl launches supplier sustainability platform

Empowering enterprise organisations and their suppliers to address sustainability challenges at scale

Seneca Partners (“Seneca”), the specialist SME investment business based in the North West, is pleased to report that Seneca EIS Portfolio Service and Seneca Growth Capital VCT portfolio company, Vizibl has expanded its sustainability functionality.

Vizibl is the world’s leading supplier collaboration and innovation platform, helping both buyers and suppliers manage all aspects of their relationship to drive sustainable business growth.

The technology company has recently launched their newest platform – Supplier Sustainability Management – designed to overcome common barriers to improve supplier sustainability by providing the tools to create supplier sustainability programmes, measure and baseline performance, set goals and chart a roadmap of targets, and prove sustainability progress over time.

Vizibl’s expertise in supplier collaboration, procurement and sustainability management is embedded in the vast supplier networks of some of the world’s largest multinational corporations such as Unilever, Vodafone and Japan based pharmaceutical giant, Astellas. 

Matt Currie, Investment Director at Seneca Partners commented: “We saw the outstanding potential of Vizibl in 2019 and invested through The Seneca Growth Capital VCT and The Seneca EIS Portfolio Service. The top-down responsibility for delivering sustainability through supply chains is not always readily appreciated but the global reach and scale of customers utilising Vizibl’s platforms will ensure high impact. What the new Sustainability module does is provide large enterprises with the tools required to make the changes we all want to see throughout their supply chains. This will have a lasting impact not only on the way they currently manage their supply chain, but also on the impact they have on the world around them for many years to come. We are excited about how the company is evolving, maturing into a real category leader and one which is classic of our approach to growth capital investment.’’   

Mark Perera, co-founder and CEO of Vizibl added: ‘’With mounting consumer and shareholder pressure on businesses to operate more sustainably, ensuring our customers have all the tools they need to accurately assess and improve their sustainability performance across their entire supplier base is key for Vizibl. By bringing Carbon Disclosure Project (CDP) and Science Based Targets initiative (SBTi) frameworks, ESG programmes and robust target-setting functionality into our platform to complement and underpin existing Supplier Collaboration & Innovation functionality, we are arming our customers with a potent set of tools to overcome common blockers and drive sustainable business growth.’’

ENDS

Notes to Editors  

Seneca Partners  

Formed in 2010, Seneca Partners is an award-winning specialist SME investment and advisory business based in the North West of England.  The team brings together decades of success in providing bespoke investment and advisory solutions for clients across a multitude of financial areas including VCT, EIS & IHT product offerings. With over 70 staff working from three offices, Seneca Partners maintains a strong regional presence in the North West and North of the UK, with strong deal flow in the SME heartland areas.   

Matt Currie, Investment Director at Seneca Partners 

Matt joined Seneca from the RBS Structured Finance team in January 2017. Working alongside the top private equity institutions in the region, Matt led deals across the Leisure/Consumer, TMT, Professional Services, Manufacturing and Infrastructure sectors. Prior to that Matt spent four years with Deloitte, qualifying as a Chartered Accountant and working on both audit and advisory engagements throughout the North West. Matt graduated from the University of Manchester in 2010 with a degree in Management with Accounting & Finance. 

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Risk summary

(Estimated reading time: 2 minutes)

Due to the potential for losses, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) considers this investment to be high risk.

What are the key risks?

  1. You could lose all the money you invest
    • If the business you invest in fails, you are likely to lose 100% of the money you invested. Most start-up businesses fail.
    • Advertised rates of return aren’t guaranteed. This is not a savings account. If the business doesn’t pay you back as agreed, you could earn less money than expected or nothing at all. In addition, if the tenant of the property being financed doesn’t pay the rent due as agreed or vacates the premises, you could earn less money than expected. A higher advertised rate of return means a higher risk of losing your money.
  2. You are unlikely to be protected if something goes wrong
    • Protection from the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS), in relation to claims against failed regulated firms, does not cover poor investment performance. Try the FSCS investment protection checker at https://www.fscs.org.uk/check/investment-protection-checker/.
    • Protection from the Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS) does not cover poor investment performance. If you have a complaint against an FCA-regulated firm, FOS may be able to consider it. Learn more about FOS protection at https://www.financial-ombudsman.org.uk/consumers.
  3. You won’t get your money back quickly
    • This type of business could face cash-flow problems that delay payments to investors. It could also fail altogether and be unable to repay any of the money owed to you.
    • Even if the business you invest in is successful, it may take several years to get your money back. You are unlikely to be able to sell your investment early.
    • Even if you are able to sell your investment early, you may have to pay exit fees or additional charges.
    • The most likely way to get your money back is if the business is bought by another business or is wound
      up following the sale of the underlying property. These events are not common.
    • If you are investing in a start-up business, you should not expect to get your money back through dividends. Start-up businesses rarely pay these. This investment aims to make quarterly repayments that comprise both a partial repayment of capital and interest, although this is not guaranteed. It could take over 14 years to receive back an amount equal to the amount you invested.
  4. This is a complex investment
    • This makes it difficult to predict how risky the investment is, but it will most likely be high.
    • You may wish to get financial advice before deciding to invest.
  5. Don’t put all your eggs in one basket
    • Putting all your money into a single business or type of investment for example, is risky. Spreading your money across different investments makes you less dependent on any one to do well.
    • A good rule of thumb is not to invest more than 10% of your money in high-risk investments. (See https://www.fca.org.uk/investsmart/5-questions-ask-you-invest).

If you are interested in learning more about how to protect yourself, visit the FCA’s website at www.fca.org.uk/investsmart

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Application Form Request – Seneca EIS Portfolio Fund


Risk summary

(Estimated reading time: 2 minutes)

Due to the potential for losses, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) considers this investment to be high risk.

What are the key risks?

  1. You could lose all the money you invest
    • If the business you invest in fails, you are likely to lose 100% of the money you invested.
    • Many of the loans ultimately financed by your investment are made to borrowers who can’t borrow money from traditional lenders such as banks. These borrowers have a higher risk of not paying back their loan.
    • Advertised rates of return aren’t guaranteed. If a borrower doesn’t pay back their loan as agreed, you could earn less money than expected. A higher advertised rate of return means a higher risk of losing your money.
  2. You are unlikely to be protected if something goes wrong
    • Protection from the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS), in relation to claims against failed regulated firms, does not cover poor investment performance. Try the FSCS investment protection checker at https://www.fscs.org.uk/check/investment-protection-checker/.
    • Protection from the Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS) does not cover poor investment performance. If you have a complaint against an FCA-regulated firm, FOS may be able to consider it. Learn more about FOS protection at https://www.financial-ombudsman.org.uk/consumers.
  3. You won’t get your money back quickly
    • Some of the loans financed by your investment will last for several years. You may need to wait for your money to be returned even if the borrower repays on time.
    • Some Managers may give you the opportunity to sell your investment early through a ‘secondary market’, but there is no guarantee you will be able to find someone willing to buy.
    • Even if your agreement is advertised as affording early access to your money, you will only get your money early if someone else wants to buy your shares or the company in which you are invested has sufficient available capital to buy them from you. If no one wants to buy, it could
      take longer to get your money back.
    • If you are investing for growth, you should not expect to get your money back through dividends as the Service is not designed to pay dividends to investors seeking growth. If you are investing for income, it will take at least 25 years to get your money back purely through dividends.
  4. Don’t put all your eggs in one basket
    • Putting all your money into a single business or type of investment for example, is risky. Spreading your money across different investments makes you less dependent on any one to do well.
    • A good rule of thumb is not to invest more than 10% of your money in high-risk investments. (See https://www.fca.org.uk/investsmart/5-questions-ask-you-invest).
  5. The value of your investment can be reduced
    • The percentage of the business that you own will decrease if the business issues more shares. This could mean that the value of your investment reduces, depending on the basis on which these new shares are issued.
    • If these new shares have additional rights that your shares don’t have, such as the right to receive a fixed dividend, this could further reduce your chances of getting a return on your investment.

If you are interested in learning more about how to protect yourself, visit the FCA’s website at www.fca.org.uk/investsmart

Risk summary

(Estimated reading time: 2 minutes)

Due to the potential for losses, the Financial Conduct Authority (“FCA”) considers this investment to be high risk.

What are the key risks?

  1. You could lose all the money you invest
    • If a business you invest in fails, you are likely to lose 100% of the money you invested in that business. Most start-up businesses fail. Please see page 14 of the Information Memorandum for an overview of the types of businesses this fund invests in.
  2. You are unlikely to be protected if something goes wrong
    • Protection from the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS), in relation to claims against failed regulated firms, does not cover poor investment performance. Try the FSCS investment protection checker at https://www.fscs.org.uk/check/investment-protection-checker/.
    • Protection from the Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS) does not cover poor investment performance. If you have a complaint against an FCA-regulated firm, FOS may be able to consider it. Learn more about FOS protection at https://www.financial-ombudsman.org.uk/consumers.
  3. You won’t get your money back quickly
    • Even if the business you invest in is successful, it may take several years to get your money back. You are unlikely to be able to sell your investment early.
    • The most likely way to get your money back is if the business is bought by another business or your shares are sold on the Alternative Investment Market. The latter can only occur if there is a willing buyer.
    • If you are investing in a start-up or EIS qualifying business, you should not expect to get your money back through dividends. Such businesses rarely pay these.
  4. Don’t put all your eggs in one basket
    • Putting all your money into a single business or type of investment for example, is risky. Spreading your money across different investments makes you less dependent on any one to do well.
    • A good rule of thumb is not to invest more than 10% of your money in high-risk investments. (See https://www.fca.org.uk/investsmart/5-questions-ask-you-invest).
  5. The value of your investment can be reduced
    • The percentage of the business that you own will decrease if the business issues more shares. This could mean that the value of your investment reduces, depending on how much the business grows. Most start-up businesses issue multiple rounds of shares.
    • These new shares could have additional rights that your shares don’t have, such as the right to receive a fixed dividend, which could further reduce your chances of getting a return on your investment.

If you are interested in learning more about how to protect yourself, visit the FCA’s website at www.fca.org.uk/investsmart

Risk summary

(Estimated reading time: 2 minutes)

Due to the potential for losses, the Financial Conduct Authority (“FCA”) considers this investment to be high risk.

What are the key risks?

  1. You could lose all the money you invest
    • If a business you invest in fails, you are likely to lose 100% of the money you invested in that business. Most start-up businesses fail. Please see page 14 of the Information Memorandum for an overview of the types of businesses this fund invests in.
  2. You are unlikely to be protected if something goes wrong
    • Protection from the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS), in relation to claims against failed regulated firms, does not cover poor investment performance. Try the FSCS investment protection checker at https://www.fscs.org.uk/check/investment-protection-checker/.
    • Protection from the Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS) does not cover poor investment performance. If you have a complaint against an FCA-regulated firm, FOS may be able to consider it. Learn more about FOS protection at https://www.financial-ombudsman.org.uk/consumers.
  3. You won’t get your money back quickly
    • Even if the business you invest in is successful, it may take several years to get your money back. You are unlikely to be able to sell your investment early.
    • For companies whose shares are not listed on any exchange (‘unquoted’ or ‘private’ companies), the most likely way to get your money back is if the business is bought by another business or lists its shares on an exchange such as the London Stock Exchange. These events are not common.
    • For companies whose shares are listed on an exchange (such as the AQSE or AIM), the most likely way to get your money back is if the business is bought by another business or your shares are sold on that exchange. The latter can only occur if there is a willing buyer.
    • If you are investing in a start-up or EIS qualifying business, you should not expect to get your money back through dividends. Such businesses rarely pay these.
  4. Don’t put all your eggs in one basket
    • Putting all your money into a single business or type of investment for example, is risky. Spreading your money across different investments makes you less dependent on any one to do well.
    • A good rule of thumb is not to invest more than 10% of your money in high-risk investments. (See https://www.fca.org.uk/investsmart/5-questions-ask-you-invest).
  5. The value of your investment can be reduced
    • The percentage of the business that you own will decrease if the business issues more shares. This could mean that the value of your investment reduces, depending on how much the business grows. Most start-up businesses issue multiple rounds of shares.
    • These new shares could have additional rights that your shares don’t have, such as the right to receive a fixed dividend, which could further reduce your chances of getting a return on your investment.

If you are interested in learning more about how to protect yourself, visit the FCA’s website at www.fca.org.uk/investsmart