Leadership team

The knowledge, experience and pedigree of our people combined with the range of our professional contacts and network are key to providing our clients and investors with services of the highest quality.

Directors of Seneca Partners

Strategic advisory committee

Business development

Business Development Manager

Business Development Manager

Business Development Manager

Client relations

Retail Operations Director

Client Relations Associate

Client Relations Associate

Tax advantaged investments

Investment Director

Investment Executive

Investment Manager

Investment Executive

Important notice

The products and services shown on this website place capital at risk. Investors may receive less in returns than they have invested. Investments may not allow for capital to be withdrawn on demand. If an investment provides tax relief then this relief is subject to change and is dependant on personal circumstances. Any reference to past performance or forecasted performance is not a reliable indicator of future performance.

Seneca Partners recommends that any investor seeks specialised financial and/or tax advice before investing. Seneca Partners does not provide advice and the information on this website, including but not limited to news, should not be construed as such.

Please confirm that you understand this warning and wish to proceed.

Richard Manley

Richard Manley is a founding Director of Seneca Partners. He was named Managing Partner in 2016. He qualified as a chartered accountant with KPMG in 2003. He worked for KPMG for over 5 years, initially in their audit business and latterly in their corporate recovery division working on financial and operational restructurings and formal insolvencies. In 2007, Richard joined NM Rothschild’s leveraged finance team in Manchester before joining Cenkos Fund Managers in June 2008. During his time with Cenkos Fund Managers, manager of a £60m pre-IPO investment fund, Richard gained extensive experience of flotations, fundraisings, mergers, acquisitions and restructurings. Richard holds a BSc (Hons) in Mathematics from the University of Birmingham.

Tim Murphy

Tim commenced his finance career with Barclays in 1983 where he fulfilled various corporate and credit roles, before joining County Natwest in 1990 where he held a number of positions in structured and acquisition finance.

In 1993, Tim joined the Royal Bank of Scotland’s fledgling Acquisition Finance business, initially establishing the Leeds office. He was subsequently responsible for all UK regional teams before in 2002, founding RBS Corporate & Structured Finance. As Joint Managing Director, he had overall responsibility for the National Mid-Cap structured finance business, whilst also being a member of the Banks Corporate Credit Committee.

In 2005, Tim was hired by Deloitte (Manchester) as a corporate finance partner with the remit to establish the National Debt Advisory business, advising on capital raising and stressed debt refinancing.

Ian Currie

Ian is a founding Director of Seneca Partners. Ian qualified as a chartered accountant in 1986 with KPMG and has been involved in corporate finance with Peel Hunt & Co, Apax Partners & Co and Altium Capital. Ian sits on the Board of Hedley & Co Stockbrokers, is a partner of Palatine Private Equity LLP and is on the Board of Trustees for the Lowry Arts Centre in Salford, Manchester.

Mark Hopton

Mark qualified as a chartered accountant with KPMG in 1992 and has gained post qualification experience in retail, manufacturing and financial services. Financial services experience gained, over the last ten years, includes both finance and compliance support covering pension services, stockbroking and fund management. Mark is part of the team which founded Seneca and his role consolidates the finance and compliance functions.

Michael Beverley

Committee Chairman

Michael is an experienced businessman with extensive business and charitable interests. He is currently the majority shareholder and Vice Chairman of One Medical Group, an award-winning solutions and healthcare provider to the NHS. Michael is the Chairman of Monteverdi Choir & Orchestras and also Indepen Limited.

Michael spent the first 28 years of his business career with Arthur Andersen, ultimately becoming UK regional and senior managing partner where he was responsible for 3,500 people, 11 offices and a turnover of £350 million.

Upon retiring in 2001, Michael developed a number of businesses centred around healthcare and property, before in 2009 making the decision to reorganise his business interests to focus exclusively on One Medical Group.

Michael has been a member for 6 years of the then Department of Trade & Industry’s Industrial Development Board, a member of Court of the University of Leeds; a member of its Commercialisation Advisory Board and its Campaign Board which is in the process of raising £100 million. Michael was also previously a member of the University of Leeds Business School’s Advisory Board.

Further, Michael was Chairman of Opera North for 12 years and a Governor of Leeds Metropolitan University for 6 years.
 

Robert Holt OBE

Strategic Advisory Committee

Robert (Bob) is best known for his previous role as Chairman of Mears Group Plc in which he had a controlling interest in Mears at the time of the flotation in October 1996. He has a background in developing support service businesses, and has operated in the service sector since 1981, initially in a financial capacity before moving into general management.

Richard Matthewman

Strategic advisory committee

Richard was previously Managing Director of Neales Waste Management until July 2012 when he completed a sale of the business. Having started the company with 6 employees and built it into a multi-site operation employing 150 people offering a complete range of series in waste and recycle management. In 1991, he became Director of Blackburn Rovers FC and later took up the role of Vice Chairman overseeing the strategies and operation of the club. Richard previously held the position of Chairman of Northcote Leisure Group which at the time consisted of Northcote Hotel Limited and Ribble Valley Inn.

Sarah Wakefield

Sarah has worked in financial services for over 25 years, having worked for Eagle Star and Zurich Financial Services before becoming a tax and trusts consultant with St. James’s Place. Latterly she has been a business development manager for Canada Life before moving in to the same role in the tax advantaged space.

Sarah has spent the last 15 years building trusted relationships with IFAs, supporting them with tax planning solutions. She holds the EISA diploma and is progressing towards becoming a chartered member of the CII.

Colin Cunningham

Colin has worked in financial services for over 35 years, with the last 16 spent working for two of the UK’s largest investment platforms. His most recent roles were intermediary facing and involved promoting platform products including SIPP, SSAS, ISA and investments to adviser firms across Scotland, Northern Ireland and the North of England.

Now based in the North West, Colin’s focus is on promoting the Seneca Partners range of investments to advisers throughout North England and Scotland.

Serjei Kalirai

Serjei has worked in the tax efficient market for over 8 years, promoting a broad range of EIS, VCT & BR investments to financial intermediaries across the UK, primarily in the Southeast. Having worked in placement agencies, Serjei has had the opportunity to work closely with almost 20 products in the sector giving him a breadth of knowledge and practical expertise.

Serjei joined Seneca in the summer of 2023 to raise capital for the Seneca Partner’s funds across the South East of England including London.

Peter Steele

Retail Operations Director

Peter is responsible for maintaining our relationship with investors across Seneca’s wider range of investments. Peter also provides technical guidance and support to advisers, intermediaries and reviewers regarding our product range.

Tagan Anderson

Client Relations Associate

Tagan is responsible for the processing and administration of new and existing investments, as well as helping advisers and investor with any queries they may have.

Hollie Murray

Client Relations Associate

Hollie is responsible for the processing and administration of new and existing investments, as well as helping advisers and investor with any queries they may have.

Matt Currie

Matt joined Seneca from the RBS Structured Finance team in January 2017 where he completed 15 Leverage Finance transactions, being primarily mid-market private equity deals. Working alongside the top private equity institutions in the region, Matt led deals across the Leisure/Consumer, TMT, Professional Services, Manufacturing and Infrastructure sectors. Prior to that Matt spent four years with Deloitte, qualifying as a Chartered Accountant and working on both audit and advisory engagements throughout the North West. Matt graduated from the University of Manchester in 2010 with a degree in Management with Accounting & Finance.

Siobhan Pycroft

Siobhan joined Seneca in 2013, as an original member of our debt advisory business before joining the Growth Capital Team in October 2019 as Investment Executive. Whilst working in our advisory business, Siobhan managed a team that advised over 1,000 SMEs relating to finance and an overall debt quantum in excess of £1 billion. Siobhan has a strong network of advisers and SMEs throughout the North West which puts her in a great position to assist SMEs with the funding requirements.

Siobhan is a graduate of the University of Cambridge and has a law degree with an emphasis on public companies, equity finance and acquisitions. She started her career in Washington D.C. working on U.S. government and economic policy pertaining to complex financial instruments and derivatives. Siobhan then joined a U.S. ranked Tier 1 global patent, intellectual property and commercial litigation firm based in Silicon Valley in Risk Management, boasting a Fortune 100 client base with offices and technology specialists across the U.S. and Europe.

Victoria Edwards

Prior to joining Seneca in 2021, Victoria worked in a Corporate Finance (M&A) advisory capacity. During ten years spent working at award-winning North West-based Corporate Finance boutiques she was involved with mid-market transactions ranging broadly from £5m to £100m covering trade disposals, debt refinancing and PE backed deals in a variety of sectors encompassing chemical distribution, insurance broking and consumer products among others. She was involved in the private equity and tech angel fund investment activities also offered by these advisory outfits.

Before graduating from The University of York with a BSc in Economics Victoria spent some time as an observer at The European Court of Human Rights and The Council of Europe in Strasbourg. She is ACA qualified and also spent time in Australia working for a specialist division of Deloitte.

James Scanlon

Prior to joining Seneca in 2022, James spent 5 years at EY in the North West corporate audit team where he qualified as a chartered accountant. He worked on a variety of clients from AIM listed to small private companies across a wide range of sectors including real estate, manufacturing and services for SMEs. At his time at EY he worked alongside the M&A team in facilitating the Entrepreneur of the year awards where he interviewed leaders of North West businesses and discussed their strategy and plans for the future. James obtained his ACA qualification through a Level 7 Master’s Degree apprenticeship as an alternative to University.

Risk summary

(Estimated reading time: 2 minutes)

Due to the potential for losses, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) considers this investment to be high risk.

What are the key risks?

  1. You could lose all the money you invest
    • If the business you invest in fails, you are likely to lose 100% of the money you invested. Most start-up businesses fail.
    • Advertised rates of return aren’t guaranteed. This is not a savings account. If the business doesn’t pay you back as agreed, you could earn less money than expected or nothing at all. In addition, if the tenant of the property being financed doesn’t pay the rent due as agreed or vacates the premises, you could earn less money than expected. A higher advertised rate of return means a higher risk of losing your money.
  2. You are unlikely to be protected if something goes wrong
    • Protection from the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS), in relation to claims against failed regulated firms, does not cover poor investment performance. Try the FSCS investment protection checker at https://www.fscs.org.uk/check/investment-protection-checker/.
    • Protection from the Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS) does not cover poor investment performance. If you have a complaint against an FCA-regulated firm, FOS may be able to consider it. Learn more about FOS protection at https://www.financial-ombudsman.org.uk/consumers.
  3. You won’t get your money back quickly
    • This type of business could face cash-flow problems that delay payments to investors. It could also fail altogether and be unable to repay any of the money owed to you.
    • Even if the business you invest in is successful, it may take several years to get your money back. You are unlikely to be able to sell your investment early.
    • Even if you are able to sell your investment early, you may have to pay exit fees or additional charges.
    • The most likely way to get your money back is if the business is bought by another business or is wound
      up following the sale of the underlying property. These events are not common.
    • If you are investing in a start-up business, you should not expect to get your money back through dividends. Start-up businesses rarely pay these. This investment aims to make quarterly repayments that comprise both a partial repayment of capital and interest, although this is not guaranteed. It could take over 14 years to receive back an amount equal to the amount you invested.
  4. This is a complex investment
    • This makes it difficult to predict how risky the investment is, but it will most likely be high.
    • You may wish to get financial advice before deciding to invest.
  5. Don’t put all your eggs in one basket
    • Putting all your money into a single business or type of investment for example, is risky. Spreading your money across different investments makes you less dependent on any one to do well.
    • A good rule of thumb is not to invest more than 10% of your money in high-risk investments. (See https://www.fca.org.uk/investsmart/5-questions-ask-you-invest).

If you are interested in learning more about how to protect yourself, visit the FCA’s website at www.fca.org.uk/investsmart

Application Form Request – Seneca IHT Service


Application Form Request – Seneca AIM EIS Fund


Application Form Request – Seneca EIS Portfolio Fund


Application Form Request – Seneca IHT Service


Application Form Request – Seneca AIM EIS Fund


Application Form Request – Seneca EIS Portfolio Fund


Risk summary

(Estimated reading time: 2 minutes)

Due to the potential for losses, the Financial Conduct Authority (FCA) considers this investment to be high risk.

What are the key risks?

  1. You could lose all the money you invest
    • If the business you invest in fails, you are likely to lose 100% of the money you invested.
    • Many of the loans ultimately financed by your investment are made to borrowers who can’t borrow money from traditional lenders such as banks. These borrowers have a higher risk of not paying back their loan.
    • Advertised rates of return aren’t guaranteed. If a borrower doesn’t pay back their loan as agreed, you could earn less money than expected. A higher advertised rate of return means a higher risk of losing your money.
  2. You are unlikely to be protected if something goes wrong
    • Protection from the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS), in relation to claims against failed regulated firms, does not cover poor investment performance. Try the FSCS investment protection checker at https://www.fscs.org.uk/check/investment-protection-checker/.
    • Protection from the Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS) does not cover poor investment performance. If you have a complaint against an FCA-regulated firm, FOS may be able to consider it. Learn more about FOS protection at https://www.financial-ombudsman.org.uk/consumers.
  3. You won’t get your money back quickly
    • Some of the loans financed by your investment will last for several years. You may need to wait for your money to be returned even if the borrower repays on time.
    • Some Managers may give you the opportunity to sell your investment early through a ‘secondary market’, but there is no guarantee you will be able to find someone willing to buy.
    • Even if your agreement is advertised as affording early access to your money, you will only get your money early if someone else wants to buy your shares or the company in which you are invested has sufficient available capital to buy them from you. If no one wants to buy, it could
      take longer to get your money back.
    • If you are investing for growth, you should not expect to get your money back through dividends as the Service is not designed to pay dividends to investors seeking growth. If you are investing for income, it will take at least 25 years to get your money back purely through dividends.
  4. Don’t put all your eggs in one basket
    • Putting all your money into a single business or type of investment for example, is risky. Spreading your money across different investments makes you less dependent on any one to do well.
    • A good rule of thumb is not to invest more than 10% of your money in high-risk investments. (See https://www.fca.org.uk/investsmart/5-questions-ask-you-invest).
  5. The value of your investment can be reduced
    • The percentage of the business that you own will decrease if the business issues more shares. This could mean that the value of your investment reduces, depending on the basis on which these new shares are issued.
    • If these new shares have additional rights that your shares don’t have, such as the right to receive a fixed dividend, this could further reduce your chances of getting a return on your investment.

If you are interested in learning more about how to protect yourself, visit the FCA’s website at www.fca.org.uk/investsmart

Risk summary

(Estimated reading time: 2 minutes)

Due to the potential for losses, the Financial Conduct Authority (“FCA”) considers this investment to be high risk.

What are the key risks?

  1. You could lose all the money you invest
    • If a business you invest in fails, you are likely to lose 100% of the money you invested in that business. Most start-up businesses fail. Please see page 14 of the Information Memorandum for an overview of the types of businesses this fund invests in.
  2. You are unlikely to be protected if something goes wrong
    • Protection from the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS), in relation to claims against failed regulated firms, does not cover poor investment performance. Try the FSCS investment protection checker at https://www.fscs.org.uk/check/investment-protection-checker/.
    • Protection from the Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS) does not cover poor investment performance. If you have a complaint against an FCA-regulated firm, FOS may be able to consider it. Learn more about FOS protection at https://www.financial-ombudsman.org.uk/consumers.
  3. You won’t get your money back quickly
    • Even if the business you invest in is successful, it may take several years to get your money back. You are unlikely to be able to sell your investment early.
    • The most likely way to get your money back is if the business is bought by another business or your shares are sold on the Alternative Investment Market. The latter can only occur if there is a willing buyer.
    • If you are investing in a start-up or EIS qualifying business, you should not expect to get your money back through dividends. Such businesses rarely pay these.
  4. Don’t put all your eggs in one basket
    • Putting all your money into a single business or type of investment for example, is risky. Spreading your money across different investments makes you less dependent on any one to do well.
    • A good rule of thumb is not to invest more than 10% of your money in high-risk investments. (See https://www.fca.org.uk/investsmart/5-questions-ask-you-invest).
  5. The value of your investment can be reduced
    • The percentage of the business that you own will decrease if the business issues more shares. This could mean that the value of your investment reduces, depending on how much the business grows. Most start-up businesses issue multiple rounds of shares.
    • These new shares could have additional rights that your shares don’t have, such as the right to receive a fixed dividend, which could further reduce your chances of getting a return on your investment.

If you are interested in learning more about how to protect yourself, visit the FCA’s website at www.fca.org.uk/investsmart

Risk summary

(Estimated reading time: 2 minutes)

Due to the potential for losses, the Financial Conduct Authority (“FCA”) considers this investment to be high risk.

What are the key risks?

  1. You could lose all the money you invest
    • If a business you invest in fails, you are likely to lose 100% of the money you invested in that business. Most start-up businesses fail. Please see page 14 of the Information Memorandum for an overview of the types of businesses this fund invests in.
  2. You are unlikely to be protected if something goes wrong
    • Protection from the Financial Services Compensation Scheme (FSCS), in relation to claims against failed regulated firms, does not cover poor investment performance. Try the FSCS investment protection checker at https://www.fscs.org.uk/check/investment-protection-checker/.
    • Protection from the Financial Ombudsman Service (FOS) does not cover poor investment performance. If you have a complaint against an FCA-regulated firm, FOS may be able to consider it. Learn more about FOS protection at https://www.financial-ombudsman.org.uk/consumers.
  3. You won’t get your money back quickly
    • Even if the business you invest in is successful, it may take several years to get your money back. You are unlikely to be able to sell your investment early.
    • For companies whose shares are not listed on any exchange (‘unquoted’ or ‘private’ companies), the most likely way to get your money back is if the business is bought by another business or lists its shares on an exchange such as the London Stock Exchange. These events are not common.
    • For companies whose shares are listed on an exchange (such as the AQSE or AIM), the most likely way to get your money back is if the business is bought by another business or your shares are sold on that exchange. The latter can only occur if there is a willing buyer.
    • If you are investing in a start-up or EIS qualifying business, you should not expect to get your money back through dividends. Such businesses rarely pay these.
  4. Don’t put all your eggs in one basket
    • Putting all your money into a single business or type of investment for example, is risky. Spreading your money across different investments makes you less dependent on any one to do well.
    • A good rule of thumb is not to invest more than 10% of your money in high-risk investments. (See https://www.fca.org.uk/investsmart/5-questions-ask-you-invest).
  5. The value of your investment can be reduced
    • The percentage of the business that you own will decrease if the business issues more shares. This could mean that the value of your investment reduces, depending on how much the business grows. Most start-up businesses issue multiple rounds of shares.
    • These new shares could have additional rights that your shares don’t have, such as the right to receive a fixed dividend, which could further reduce your chances of getting a return on your investment.

If you are interested in learning more about how to protect yourself, visit the FCA’s website at www.fca.org.uk/investsmart